Melody of the Israeli national anthem

The famous main theme of “The Moldau” comprises the first musical stanza of “Hatikvah,” the Israeli national anthem, with slight changes.
These changes for the anthem may reflect origin in “La Mantovana, ” a widely popular melody in Renaissance Europe and more recent times.

“The Moldau” (“Vltava”), a symphonic poem by Bedřich Smetana, is from Má Vlast (My Country).

For more about “The Moldau” see Robert Cummings, www.allmusic.com.

The melody of the second stanza of the anthem shifts to “Russian Sailors Dance” in the ballet The Red Poppy,  from a Russian folk tune.

The Red Poppy , 1927, was the first Soviet ballet with a modern revolutionary theme according to Wikipedia.

The entirety of “Hatikvah” is nationalistic. It is also Eurocentric. The direction of Jerusalem in the anthem is toward the east, appropriate for Europeans. For Jews in Baghdad, Persia, and India, Jerusalem is toward the west. Admittedly Jerusalem is also toward the east for Jews in North Africa.

Author: teawithsugar31

Nesanel ben Yitzchok HaLevi

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