At the Culmination of Yom HaKippurim – the Day of Atonement

The sun is setting.  The congregation’s spirits have revived.  Some of us feel like angels, who neither eat nor drink.

Forgiveness shines out.

 

The leader of the congregation proclaims —

· Hear O Israel, the L-rd is our G-d, the L-rd is One!

The congregation itself proclaims even louder —

· Hear O Israel, the L-rd is our G-d, the L-rd is One!

The leader of the congregation proclaims —

◦ Blessed is the name of the glory of His Kingdom forever and ever!
◦ Blessed is the name of the glory of His Kingdom forever and ever!
◦ Blessed is the name of the glory of His Kingdom forever and ever!

The congregation responds —

◦ Blessed is the name of the glory of His Kingdom forever and ever!
◦ Blessed is the name of the glory of His Kingdom forever and ever!
◦ Blessed is the name of the glory of His Kingdom forever and ever!

The leader of the congregation proclaims —

  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!

The congregation responds —

  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!
  • The L-rd is The G-d!

The leader of the congregation proclaims —

◦ May His Great Name be exalted and hallowed . . .

In the world that He created according to His will. /

And may He establish His kingship /

And bring forth His redemption /

And hasten the arrival of His Messiah . . .

In your lives and in your days . . .

[Exalted and hallowed] higher than all blessings and songs /

Praises and consolations /

That angels utter . . .

The leader of the congregation sounds the shofar with a great blast after the congregation has broken out in singing and dancing.

Victoriously all proclaim —

• Next year in Jerusalem!

◦ May all our prayers and our beggings be accepted before our Father Who is in Heaven . . .

He Who makes the peace in His heavens /

May He make peace among us . . .

Advertisements

Return Envelopes

Until recently, return envelopes in bills,* for instance, have been inserted in mailings with the flaps turned forward.

Not an especially big deal.

I take out a bill and want to replace it in the mailing that I received, but the flap gets in the way.

This should be the worse thing that ever happens to anyone.

Then all of a sudden, I received a few bills from the same businesses, and the return envelope has been inserted turned around in a sensible way.

What happened?

Is the Vast Eternal Plan changing?


  • bills in the mail – Why not? I often pay them electronically, but I like the offline paper copy. Among other things, the paper copies remind me to enter the electronic debits into the register of my checking account. If I were a rich man, perhaps I wouldn’t bother to balance my checkbook.
  • Actually, I am a “rich man.” My riches include children and grandchildren who live practically around the corner, good health (for my age, having reached the milestone of 64 years old as I write this), and on and on.

Hot Tea WITH Sugar

Zeide muses . . .

We sit along a well-used, white, oil-cloth covered table. The Ein Ya’akov books are open for today’s lines.

“From the rising sun until it sets . . .” — tea with sugar. WITH — the only English word here. I’m the only speaker of English sitting on the bench, but no matter. My great-grandfather hunches over my shoulder, whispering.

His whisper swirls through the mouth of the zogger — the one who says what’s written, and I hear.

“Someone who reads the Megillah backwards didn’t go out.” Go out? Where? Why read it backwards anyway? Spoiler alert!

The table sprouts glasses of sweet tea, too hot to drink. The sun is setting, but slowly. I dovvened  this morning, and then we sat down to drink hot tea with sugar quickly.

“I heard that you’re from Chicago. The Rebbe was in Chicago.” Perhaps my Zeide Segal saw him. (Now I’m Zeide Segal.) “Do you remember whose yohrtzeit is tomorrow?”

The Chicago connection fails me. The tea connection doesn’t. The Rebbe was escorted from a wintery train platform to a hotel where they surely served him — a glass of hot tea with sugar. A glozz tay.

“Every year I go up to the Mount of Olives to pay my respects. But this year . . . it’s dangerous. Reb Boruch Mordecai of Bobruisk is my ancestor.” The Great Luminary. The Spicy, Biting Sharp. Wise but Humble. He was summoned to the Yeshivah of Above, 14 Elul 5617.

But it’s not dangerous here in Jerusalem of Above. Tomorrow afternoon I’ll go pay respects.

“Absolutely not. It’s dangerous. I take no responsibility.”

This was worn into the pavement of Mazkeret Moshe Street near Congregation Yismach Moshe. I wore my hiking boots then, and then again when a Yerushalmi bochur accompanied me to the Mount of Olives Cemetery. “Aim for the resting place of the holy Ohr HaChaim, but swerve south about ten meters before you reach his tziyun.” Believe me, I toiled and I found.

Congregation Knesseth Israel is hosting me for this evening’s hot tea and Ein Ya’akov lines. “From the rising sun until it sets . . .” — tea with sugar.

  • Ein Ya’akov
  • “From the rising sun until it sets . . .” – Psalms 113:
  • the only English word here – Tea has probably entered the English language from Ancient Chinese after several hand-offs over time. Sugar has probably entered the English language from Sanskrit after a number of hand-offs over time.
  • “Someone who reads the Megillah backwards” – Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Megillah, 17a.
  • didn’t go out – I’m having fun with the Hebrew term that means “didn’t fulfill the mitzvah.”
  • The Rebbe was in Chicago – His Holiness, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Scheersohn, the previous Lubavitcher Rebbe, visited Chicago in 1942.