Someone whose scandalous behavior warrants being fired today …

… but they expect him to come in for a last day tomorrow.

Why let the creep come in tomorrow?

For a going away party, of course!

“Scandal just happens. A party is a plan,” quoth Nesanel.

Based on a real event in the U.S. Capital
Wednesday, February 7, 2018
(except for my fantasy about throwing a party)

 

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Land once earmarked for the U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem

Area where the U.S. Embassy could have been built. Note several parcels of land that are still undeveloped. The western parcel is on Israel’s side of the 1949 Armistice Line. The Israeli President’s House, Beit Hanatziv, is nearby on Hebron Road.

This map, below, identifies the location of land that was once earmarked for the U.S. Embassy.

JerusalemConsulateGeneral

In theory, there is land in Jerusalem set aside for a new U.S. Embassy. On President Ronald Reagan’s last day in office in [January] 1989, then-U.S. Ambassador to Israel William Brown signed a contract for a patch of land in West[ern] Jerusalem for $1 a year on a 99-year lease. This space [7 to 14 acres in the Talpiot neighborhood] was later zoned for “diplomatic purposes” by the Israeli government with the intention of building a U.S. Embassy there.

Although it was initially hoped during the 1990s that a U.S. Embassy could sit there, after the al-Qaeda bombings of U.S. embassies in Tanzania and Kenya in 1998, new safety standards were put in place that require embassies to be set back 100 feet from any adjacent roads due to the risk of car bombs and other attacks. “With the new rules, that land is not big enough,” Shapiro said. For context, the space in Talpiot is seven to 14 acres, according to different sources, while the new U.S. Embassy in Lebanon sits on 43 acres.

From The Washington Post
By Adam Taylor | December 7, 2017

From: Nesanel –

Note, though, that the vacant western parcel lies entirely within pre-1967 Jerusalem. However, the new Consulate General Annex lies in what was no man’s land. The entire area on the maps was annexed by Israel into the City of Jerusalem shortly after the 1967 Six Day War.

The U.S. has had a consulate general in Jerusalem since 1844.

See Wikipedia , “Consulate General of the United States, Jerusalem,” and “Jerusalem Embassy Act.”

Are the Jews of Today Really Descendants of Abraham? Should They Inherit the Land?

It doesn’t matter.
Being Jewish is being a member of G-d’s Covenant at Mount Sinai. Over the centuries, some women and men said, in effect, “Count me in,” and so they became members of the Covenant by observing its specifics and generalities.
(I posted this before – “Ashkenazi Jews and their long-ago European mothers.”)

Wait, Wait . . .

. . . don’t tell me!

Governments are supposed to make jobs.

If that’s the case, then government bureaucracies are good. Let governments hire a few more people, then a few more.

Taxes are good since they can be spent on salaries for civil servants.

I’m going to reread the U.S. Constitution. Perhaps I missed this clause. Maybe it’s an amendment.

Islamophia

Radio talk host Alex Jones is confused about what a burqa is and what a hijab is.

If there is a Muslim woman in North America or in Europe who has her face covered by a burqa – a full covering except for her eyes – she is unique. Essentially, a burqa covering is so extreme that it is not even worn in Saudi Arabia or in Iran.

If a Christian nun is still wearing a habit, she is probably covering her neck and ears in addition to her hair just like many Muslim women. This is called a hijab in Arabic.

A somewhat more conservative head covering than a hijab is a niqab. A woman wraps longer fabric over her mouth and nostrils (sometimes a little higher on the nose).

I almost dressed like that today when I went outside. Here in Kansas City, the midday temperature (as I write this) is 18° (Fahrenheit). Besides a ski cap over my ears, I would have covered even my my mouth. But, for this former Chicagoan, 18° and no wind is fine.

The temperature now in Chicago, though, is 12°. If I were standing on an El platform waiting for a train, it’s not unlikely for me to pull up my scarf over my mouth. Some platforms – especially where I used to commute from – are entirely exposed to bitterly cold wind. So at times I protect my face with a ‘niqab’.

How do I know what I’m talking about? I would often sit in a study area at the University of Missouri – Kansas City that was popular with Muslim young people. So, I checked that what the young women were wearing were hijabs.

One time I was sitting across from a young lady who was wearing a hijab, and I asked her what a niqab was. She lifted a longer end of her hijab over her mouth thereby showing me a niqab. So I speak with authority.

Interestingly enough, it came up in conversation that she was from Saudi Arabia. In my nosy way, I told her that I was surprised to see that she was alone. In truth, she told me that she had come with a brother, but he had already finished his studies and had returned to Saudi Arabia. “My parents trust me,” she said. “It would be sad if they didn’t.”

I believe that G-d trusts us. It would be sad if he didn’t.

_________________

* I sometimes listen to Alex Jones (carried on radio here) so that you don’t have to. It’s possible that he will be my bête noire for March.

* a study area that was popular with young Muslims. The women wearing hijabs is one give-away. The other clue was that several were speaking Arabic. I don’t speak Arabic, but I recognize it. I can be an amateur linguist since I’ve heard plenty of Arabic in Israel.

The ‘Two State Solution’ Died in 1949

The idea of an independent Palestinian state west of the Jordan River died when the Arab Legion invaded the West Bank in 1948. The land westward from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean was supposed to be divided into two states. One would be a Jewish state and the other would be an Arab state for those who were living there.

War was out of the question. The United Nations’ plan included the directive that both states would engage in economic cooperation – actually an Economic Union.

This plan was the United Nations Partition Plan for when Britain left the region. The plan arguably had the status of international law. The Security Council’s resolution concerned Britain. It set forth how the region that was mandated to the British to administer would look like when the British left. Britain tried (arguably) to set up the partition and to establish the outcome.

However, the Arab Legion violated this international law when it attacked Israel. Then, the Kingdom of Jordan annexed the West Bank – a new violation of international law.

The international community had helped Israel and Jordan negotiate an armistice in 1949. Since both sides agreed, the cease fire had the force of international law also.

The next time that the parties reached an agreement – negotiated by outsiders – was in 1993 through 1995. This was the Oslo Accords. These accords, which were signed by representatives of the Palestinians and of Israel, is the last word of international law.

UN resolutions passed by its Security Council arguably do not have the force of law. The United Nations is fulfilling its obligation to promote peace and security. It’s not unusual for effective parties to disdain peace and security.

Another event bears discussing. The International Court of Justice – commonly referred to as the World Court – is the principal judicial organ of the United Nations. However, it tries to resolve disputes wherein both parties agree to appear. It is out of the question for the Court to rule unilaterally.

To repeat. The Oslo Accords are the only agreement, the only law between Palestinians and Israel.

Palestinians cannot justifiably complain that they are living in cantons. Their representative signed off on this.

They have a right and obligation to regulate life in what are called Areas A and B. Only Israel has the right to regulate life and to develop new housing, industry, and parks in Area C.

If Palestinians wished to pick up where things stood in the middle 2000s everything could go back onto the negotiating table.

However, this is so unlikely that I can relax, heat up some water, and relax drinking hot tea with sugar. The ‘Two State Solution’ is dead.

“There are no victims . . .

. . . only volunteers.” *

So reads the script of the television series Chance.

— Character D in the TV series Chance
Season 1, Episode 2, “The Axiom of Choice” at about 4:38

“Once is a mistake. Twice is a decision.”

— Character: Therapist Suzanne Silver in the TV series Chance
Season 1, Episode 1, “The Summer of Love” at about 41:00

“Be the still point in the turning world.”

— Character D in the TV series Chance
Season 1, Episode 5, “A Still Point in the Turning World” at about 5:50

__________________

* Produced by Fox21 Television Studios & distributed by hulu.com — 2016