See you tomorrow, over the radio

Kai Ryssdal hosts the public radio (listener supported) program Marketplace on a daily basis Monday through Friday.

He signs off the program saying,

See you tomorrow, everybody.

Am I the only one whose radio doesn’t come with a camera? Can Ryssdal see me through his website?

Stick that in your tea and drink it.

Gourmet vanilla extract

McCormick  markets gourmet premium pure organic vanilla extract. They tout its quality by telling us that the hand-picked vanilla beans “are left on the vine for up to 9 months to ensure vanilla flavor the way it was intended to be.”

So then, what does “up to 9 months” on the vine mean? Does it mean that some of the beans stay on the vine for only one month? Does it in fact mean that only a token number of beans remain on the vine for a full nine months?

My curmudgeonly take on writing hardened by reading American journalist Theodore M. Bernstein (1904–1979). He was the assistant managing editor of The New York Times from 1951 to 1969.

Among his several books, he wrote Watch Your Language: A Lively, Informal Guide to Better Writing, Emanating from the News Room of the New York Times  (1958). (My copy is still boxed up from my move ten months ago.)

So how am I doing in the writing department? Do I write better after hot tea with sugar? Of course, you wouldn’t know.

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See Theodore M. Bernstein papers, Manuscripts and Archives Division, The New York Public Library.

Embarrassment and sadness in the U.S.

I don’t think … that the American people, by and large, are angry. I think they’re deeply embarrassed, and I think they’re sad about what has come to the country. And I think, at the end of the day, embarrassment and sadness are more explosive than anger.

George F. Will

Conservative columnist
Interviewed by Lawrence O’Donnell on MSNBC
July 24, 2018

I’ve postponed my bête noire appointments

This month was going to be dedicated to the Palestinian Authority — how they’ve done nothing helpful for their people.

U.S. President Donald Trump’s policies generally aggravate me (March into April).

On the other hand, pundit Bill Bennett (February) has cut back from being an apologist for President Trump. Listening to him has become less aggravating, sometimes not even aggravating at all.

Coverage by journalists tends to aggravate me. More of that in future months.

U.S. tax forms just aggravated me — the forms, not the tax levy.

So, let me step back to watch the star Sirius.

Let me catch up with Israel’s regional and city planning.

And let me sit back to drink a glass of hot tea with sugar.

Me and The Washington Post

It started with a current event – President Donald Trump announced that the U.S. would be relocating its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

I found current information about this news story from the digital Washington Post. The digital content included a video of U.S. Vice President Pence’s speech to Israel’s Knesset (parliament) in Jerusalem. I had also been looking at official sources such as the U.S. Department of State and the president’s official site, whitehouse.gov.

After viewing a few online articles from The Washington Post, they offered me a trial subscription – one dollar for the first month and “only” ten dollars for each month after.

My subscription to The Washington Post, digital edition, came in handy last month when I was thinking about how President Trump’s statements and policies aggravate me (if I let them). The President has, in effect, become my bête noire for March and now for the first part of April (only).

Little did I know that Mr. Trump would be railing against the Post and its owner Jeff Bezos of Amazon.com. Mr. Trump’s rant warrants a separate post.

If you subscribe to President Trump’s views, then you may dismiss much of what I write. However, please note that I do not take a stand in the “Culture Wars.” In addition, I’m not pleased with Amazon.com’s burgeoning hegemony over American merchandising. I don’t buy anything from Amazon. I search other online vendors rather than buy from Amazon, even if I can save a few cents with Amazon. My savings would be otherwise someone else’s loss.

Still and all, I’m generally pleased with news and opinion coverage by The Washington Post.

To create again or not to

Mariela Castaneda, a spokesperson for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), explained the closure of a parcel of public land. The open desert area in Arizona had become a popular spot for illegal target shooting. Unfortunately, a stray bullet killed a pregnant woman in January 2018.

Castaneda said, “While the BLM understands the temporary closure will impact recreational opportunities in the … area, it is necessary for the safety of the recreating public and those conducting power line repair and fiber optic line burial.”

From the Scottsdale Republic, “Feds close BLM land after stray-bullet death,” Friday, February 23, 2018, section SR, Z8, pp. 16-17.

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What we say can become ambiguous when it appears in writing.

“Scottsdale reveals flag design finalists; public can weigh in”

“Several months after an open call for design ideas, 10 finalists are in the running to be the city’s official flag.” *

Really? Would you like to be a city’s official flag?

* The lead sentence in the Scottsdale Republic. Friday, Feb. 9, 2018. Section Z8, page 15.

See the previous post.