When did the Department of Health and Human Services know that migrant children would be taken from parents?

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services supervises the migrant children who have been taken from parents. When did they start making preparations for this policy?

It’s inconceivable that facilities and personnel are in place today without sufficient preparation time. This suggests that the Trump administration has been planning for awhile to implement this policy.

Surprisingly, no one leaked any advanced information to the press. No whistle blower came along to let the public know that a cruel policy was in the offing. It remains possible that people considered that separating children from their parents was only a contingency, that Mr. Trump would never go so far. Do I believe in contingencies? No.

It seems that the President has his house in order (finally). As a businessman, his acumen is acute. He has been running the executive branch firmly and surely. What has seemed to be a whim on his part may have been part of a plan to catch us off guard. He has been building a new Trump enterprise slowly but surely.

This truly frightens me.

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U.S. Immigration Regulations

“We have the worst immigration laws of any country anywhere in the world.” “… we have the biggest loopholes of any country anywhere in the world.”

President Donald Trump
Bethpage, New York, May 23, 2018

Whose fault is it? Congress’s and several Presidents’.

Congress has not addressed the subject of immigration in a comprehensive way since about 1980.

U.S. Embassy opens in Jerusalem

by Nesanel Segal | Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Monday’s opening of the U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem was not yet the promised move of the embassy from Tel Aviv. The ambassador now has an office in the Jerusalem Consulate General’s annex campus instead of in a rented room at the King David Hotel. A plaque now marks the identity as ‘United States Embassy – Jerusalem, Israel’ and adds President Trump’s name.

This first phase only involves shifting the ambassador and core staff to Jerusalem — less than a half-dozen people. The new presence will operate as a diplomatic nerve center.
Including building modifications and additional security, this first move cost less than $400,000, within the revised budget.

Some Palestinians view moving the embassy as a major betrayal of Washington’s decades-old role as a potential broker for a peace deal with Israel. Those who arrived at the ceremony to celebrate the opening of the new embassy dismissed claims that the move undermines the chances for peace between Israelis and Palestinians.

On Tuesday, May 15th, Palestinians marked the Nakba, Arabic for “catastrophe,” a term used for the flight and expulsion of an estimated 600,000 Palestinians seven decades ago upon Israel’s creation.

President Trump’s national security adviser, John Bolton, asserted that moving the embassy from Tel Aviv is “a recognition of reality” that ends the United States and Israel “operating on a completely different wavelength.”

“Recognizing reality always enhances the chances for peace,” Bolton added.

Adapted from The Washington Post, Ruth Eglash with Brian Murphy, “Jerusalem welcomes the new U.S. Embassy as Palestinians decry ‘hostile’ move,” Middle East, revised, May 14, 2018.

Don’t force disbanding of a foreign army

This issue came up concerning peace with North Korea. Some pundits and some experts (some pundits are lamentably not experts) are suggesting that North Korea disband its army in exchange for a peace treaty with South Korea.

While this idea has merit, it is unwise. North Korea’s military is a huge employer – perhaps the largest employer in the country. How would these men earn a living otherwise? Disbanding North Korea’s army would disrupt their society, and who needs that?

Me and The Washington Post

It started with a current event – President Donald Trump announced that the U.S. would be relocating its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

I found current information about this news story from the digital Washington Post. The digital content included a video of U.S. Vice President Pence’s speech to Israel’s Knesset (parliament) in Jerusalem. I had also been looking at official sources such as the U.S. Department of State and the president’s official site, whitehouse.gov.

After viewing a few online articles from The Washington Post, they offered me a trial subscription – one dollar for the first month and “only” ten dollars for each month after.

My subscription to The Washington Post, digital edition, came in handy last month when I was thinking about how President Trump’s statements and policies aggravate me (if I let them). The President has, in effect, become my bête noire for March and now for the first part of April (only).

Little did I know that Mr. Trump would be railing against the Post and its owner Jeff Bezos of Amazon.com. Mr. Trump’s rant warrants a separate post.

If you subscribe to President Trump’s views, then you may dismiss much of what I write. However, please note that I do not take a stand in the “Culture Wars.” In addition, I’m not pleased with Amazon.com’s burgeoning hegemony over American merchandising. I don’t buy anything from Amazon. I search other online vendors rather than buy from Amazon, even if I can save a few cents with them. My savings are someone else’s loss.

Still and all, I’m generally pleased with news and opinion coverage by The Washington Post.

Trump proposes to betray an ally

A U.S. withdrawal of its troops from Syria constitutes a betrayal of Israel. Israel’s security depends on a robust American force against the Assad regime. Otherwise, the regime is liable to create mayhem for Israel.

As usual, President Trump did not consult experts when he announced a U.S. withdrawal. Judging by a reported reaction from Israel’s Prime Minister Netanyahu, no one in Israel’s establishment was consulted either.

What is likely to happen? Mr.Trump has made his point. Making an anti-establishment point is all that the President’s supporters expect. Now, the Pentagon and Congress will continue pretty much as if President Trump had not made his unilateral declaration.

The immigrant First Family

U.S. President Donald Trump has had two foreign born wives. Both were born in the Slavic region of Central Europe. The present First Lady is from the Slovenian region of the former Czechoslovakia. Mr. Trump’s first wife was also born in Czechoslovakia – in the Czech region.

President Trump has proposed that future immigrants to the U.S. be restricted to the most skilled people. So, I ask the question that others ask: what superior skills have his wives brought to the United States? Does the U.S. have a shortage of willowy, bosomy women?

According to Mr. Trump’s proposed standards, would his wives have qualified for anything but three-month tourist visas with round-trip tickets?

On the other hand, these two of his three wives have demonstrated the unique skill set of being married to Donald Trump, the not-yet president.