Sirius in October

October 16, 2018 | Kansas City

The constellation Orion appeared due south at about 5:30 AM DST. This was about two hours before sunrise.

The star Sirius shown brightly in its expected place in the sky.

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Sirius on the TV screen

The star Sirius appears over the London skyline as the camera pans upward. The constellation Orion appears, and it becomes clear that the bright star is Sirius – pointed to by Orion’s belt.

Miss Marple, by Agatha Christie

At Bertram’s Hotel,” Episode 3.1

first aired September 23, 2007 (begins at about minute 43:14)

Streaming from hulu.com

P.S.: The cinematography is above average, especially for a television show.

Watching the star Sirius in early January

Wednesday, January 3, 2018 – Kansas City, USA

I saw the constellation Orion in the southeastern sky, just above the tree line, at 6:30 PM Central Standard Time. This was about one hour and twenty minutes after local sunset.

Sirius would correspondingly have been in the east-northeast, still below the horizon.

The sky here was too cloudy tonight to see much other than the brightest stars.

Watching the star Sirius in early October

Tuesday, October 11, 2016 – Kansas City, USA

At 6:15 AM Daylight Time, I saw Sirius about two hand breadths above the horizon, just a bit east of due south. This was about one hour and ten minutes before local sunrise.

The constellation Orion was correspondingly just a bit west of due south.

Compare this with my earliest sighting this year on August 21st. Then, Sirius rose only a short time before sunrise.

More importantly, Sirius was then roughly 20 degrees ahead of the sun. Today, Sirius was about 80 degrees ahead of the sun.

Sirius – the Star

Kansas City, USA

Recently, I was awake before sunrise, and I spotted the constellation Orion in the southeast just before sunrise. This was at Kansas City’s Kosher Barbecue Competition and Festival, Sunday, August 21, 2016.

Follow Orion’s belt Earthward and you see the star Sirius, apparently the brightest star in the sky (in the Northern hemisphere, at least, where I am).

The constellation Orion has been “behind” the Sun until recently. Before that, it was blotted out by the daytime sky. Even Sirius is too faint to be seen (with the naked eye, at least) during daytime.

Sirius skims the horizon. It’s not part of a zodiacal constellation as Orion is. Sirius is not in the path of the Moon or the planets, for example.

I noticed the distinctive Orion and located Sirius by 5:45 AM Daylight Time. Sirius was in an east-southeast direction while the sun was rising in the northeast. Sirius was visible until 6:15 AM or so. By that time, the sky was too bright for the naked eye to detect Sirius. The sun actually rose at about 6:38 AM.

When I first noticed Sirius, is was about a handbreadth above the horizon but finally reached about another handbreadth higher.

Who cares? What difference does it make?

Besides interesting me – a star that is easily seen and that skims the horizon – the first sighting of Sirius marked the beginning of the ancient Egyptian year. Sirius first reappears from “behind” the sun during the inundation season of the Nile River. In the near future, the Nile’s waters recede from having flooded Egypt’s agricultural land, and have deposited fresh silt. Egyptian agriculture begins again.

This fresh silt is the source of Egypt’s agricultural fertility. Egyptians harvested at least two crops during the growing season. With irrigation from the Nile, they often harvested a third crop. Egypt had been the breadbasket of the region. Egyptians regularly exported surplus wheat.

Awake, O Egypt, awake.